D&D 4th Edition Rules

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D&D 4th Edition Rules

Post by TheDeceiverGod on 1/11/2011, 8:26 pm

While I think it's been decided that for the up coming Dice RP we shall be using a bastard set of rules to be devised by yours truly, but I plan on drawing heavily from D&D's 4th edition. Not only do I have access to them, but they recently simplified, and I can be reasonable assured that they'll work. It even has sexy tables, just for you ;p


The Core Mechanic
  1. Roll a D20. You want to roll high.
  2. Add all relevant modifiers.
  3. Compare the total to a target number.
    if your check result is higher than or equal to the target number, you succeeded. If your check result is lower than the target number, you fail.

Three Basic Rules
  • Simple Rules, Many Exceptions
  • Specific Beats General
  • Always Round Down

Character Creation

  • Choose your Race
    Probably n/a
  • Choose your Class
    Probably n/a
  • Determine Ability Scores
    Ability Scores describe the fundamental strengths of your body and mind. Your race adjusts the scores you generate and the different classes rely on different ability scores.
  • Choose Skills
    Skills measure your ability to perform tasks such as jumping across chasms, hiding from observers, and identifying monsters.
  • Select Feats
    Feats are natural advantages or special training you possess.
  • Choose Powers
    Each class offers a different selection of powers to choose from.
    Not entirely sure what I'm going to do with this one, I want to give the players as much freedom with their hero's powers as possible, but D&D literally just hands you a huge list of powers for each class (It's so they can sell you the additional books!)
  • Choose Equipment.
    Pick your character's armor, weapons, implements, and basic adventuring gear.
    Again not entirely sure how to apply this, but I should have something serviceable by time I've worked out the basic gaming mechanics.
  • Fill in the Numbers.
    Calculate your hit points, Armor Class, and other defenses, initiative, attack bonuses, damage bonuses, and skill check bonuses.
  • Roleplaying Character Details.
    Flesh out your character with details about your personality appearance and beliefs.
    my personal favorite part Razz


Ability Scores


Strength(Str)
Strength measures your character's physical power. It's important for most characters who fight hand-to-hand.

  • Melee basic attacks are based on Strength.
  • Clerics, Fighters, Paladins, Rangers, and Warlords have powers based on Strength.
  • Your Strength might contribute to your Fortitude defense.
  • Strength is the key ability for Athletics Skill Checks.

Constitution(Con)
Constitution represents your character's health, stamina, and vital force. All characters benefit from a high Constitution score.
  • Your Constitution score is added to your hit points at 1st level.
  • The number of healing surges your can use each day is influenced by your Constitution.
  • Your Constitution might contribute to your Fortitude defense.
  • Constitution is the key ability for Endurance skill checks.

Dexterity(Dex)
Dexterity measures hand-eye coordination, agility, reflexes, and balance.
  • Ranged basic attacks are based on Dexterity.
  • Your Dexterity might contribute to your Reflex defense.
  • If you wear light armor, your Dexterity might contribute to your Armor Class.
  • Dexterity is the key ability for Acrobatics, Stealth, and Thievery skill checks.

Intelligence(Int)
Intelligence describes how well your character learns and reasons.
  • Your intelligence might contribute to your Reflex defense.
  • If you wear light armor, your Intelligence might contribute to your Armor Class.
  • Intelligence is the key ability for Arcana, History, and Religion skill checks.

Wisdom(Wis)
Wisdom measures your common sense, perception, self-discipline, and empathy. You use your Wisdom score to notice details, sense danger, and get a read on people.
  • Your Wisdom might contribute to your Will defense.
  • Wisdom is the key ability for Dungeoneering, Heal, Insight, Nature, and Perception Skill checks.

Charisma(Cha)
Charisma measures your force of personality, persuasiveness, and leadership.
  • Your Charisma might contribute to your Will defense.
  • Charisma is the key ability for Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, and Streetwise skills checks.


Each of your ability scores is a number that measures the power of that ability. A character with a 16 Strength is much stronger than a character with a 6 Strength. A score of 10 or 11 is the normal human average, but player characters are a cut above average in most abilities. As you advance in levels, your ability scores keep getting better.

Your ability score determines an ability modifier that you add to any attack, check, roll, or defense based on that ability. For instance, making a melee attack with a battle axe is a Strength attack, so you add the ability modifier for your Strength score to your attack rolls and damage rolls. If your score is 17 you're pretty strong; you add +3 to your attack rolls and damage rolls when you make that attack.

Your ability scores also influence your defenses, since you add your ability modifier to your defense score.
  • For Fortitude Defense, you add the higher of your Strength or Constitution ability modifiers.
  • For Reflex Defense, you add the higher of your Dexterity or Intelligence ability modifiers.
  • For Will Defense, you add the higher of your Wisdom or Charisma ability modifiers.
  • If you wear light armor or no armor, you also add the higher of your Dexterity or Intelligence ability modifiers to your Armor Class.

Ability Modifiers
Ability Score Ability Modifier Ability Score Ability Modifier
1 -5 16-17 +3
2-3 -4 18-19 +4
4-5 -3 20-21 +5
6-7 -2 22-23 +6
8-9 -1 24-25 +7
10-11 +0 26-27 +8
12-13 +1 28-29 +9
14-15 +2 and so on...
Generating Ability Scores

You can use one of three methods to generate ability scores. In each method, you can take the numbers you generate and assign them to whichever ability score you want. Remember, your class determines which ability scores are important to you, and your race modifies certain ability scores.

Ability scores increase as a character gains levels. When you assign your initial scores, remember that they'll improve with time.
Method 1: Standard Array
Take these six numbers and assign them to your abilities anyway you like: 16, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10. Apply your racial ability adjustments after you assign the scores to your abilities.
Method 2: Customizing Scores
This method is a little more complicated than the standard array, but it gives comparable results. With this method, you can build a character who's really good in one ability score, but at the cost of having average scores in the other five.
Star with these six scores: 8, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10. You have 22 points to spend on improving them. The cost of raising a score from one number to a higher number is shown on the table below.
Score Cost Score Cost
9 -(1)* 14 5
10 0(2)* 15 7
11 1 16 9
12 2 17 12
13 318 16
*If your score is 8, you can pay 1 to make it 9 or 2 to make it 10. You must buy your score up to 10 before you can improve it further.
Method 3:Rolling Scores
Some players like the idea of generating ability scores randomly. The results of this method can be really good, or it can be really bad. On average, you'll come out a little worse than if you had used the standard array. If you roll well, you can come out way ahead, but if you roll poorly, you might generate a character who's virtually unplayable. Use this method with caution. Roll four 6-sided dice (4D6) and add up the highest three numbers do that six times, and then assign the numbers you generate to your six ability scores. Apply your racial ability adjustments.

If the total of your ability modifiers is lower than +4 or higher than +8 before the racial ability adjustments, your DM might rule that your character is too weak or too strong compared to the other characters in the group and decided to adjust your scores to fit better within his or her campaign preferences.

The Nine Alignments
Choose one

Chaotic Evil, True Evil, Lawful Evil, Chaotic Neutral, True Neutral, Lawful Neutral, Chaotic Good, True Good, or Lawful Good.


Making Checks

Every power, skill, and special feature in the game is keyed to one of the six ability scores. You resolve actions by making different kinds of checks, all of which use the same core mechanic: roll a D20, add any modifiers, and announce the result. Your Dungeon Master then compares your check result against a target number, the Difficulty Class (DC) of the test, task, or attack that you're attempting. Most difficult class numbers are set for the Dungeon Master; for example an ogre savage has an Armor Class of 19, and climbing a typical dungeon wall has a DC of 15.

Other times, your Dungeon Master estimates the DC of a task that isn't specifically covered by the rules. The D&D game uses three basic kinds of checks, which are described further bellow: attack rolls, skills checks, and ability checks. if you try to hit a monster with a mace, you're making a Strength attack against the monster's AC; if you try to blast a monster with a fireball spell, it's an Intelligence attack against Reflex defense; if you try to balance on a tightrope, it's an Acrobatics check against a DC set by the DM; if you try to bash down a door, it's a STrength check against a set DC that depends on the nature of the door. The description of each power and skill tells you what ability you base its check on. Occasionally, you make a check that is compared against someone else's check result. Doing this is called making an opposed check.

A modifier is any number that adds to or subtracts from a die roll. The most commonly used modifiers are based on your ability scores. A bonus refers to positive values. If a feat adds your Dexterity modifier to damage, it won't do anything if your Dexterity modifier isn't positive. A penalty is the opposite; it's always negative. Part of creating a character is figuring out your normal check modifiers for common tasks such as making attacks or using skills. Most checks in the game add additional modifiers, including the following.
  • Your bonus from your weapon proficiency if you're making an attack.
  • Your skill training bonus if you're using a skill.
  • Bonuses that apply to the circumstances of the check (charge attacks or combat advantage, for example)
  • Penalties that apply to the circumstances (your target has cover, you're attacking while prone, and so on.)


Your modifiers reflect everything about you that is relevant to the task at hand: your training, competence, and native ability. The D20 roll represents luck, fate, fortune, and the unpredictable opportunities or sudden distractions. A battle is full of frantic action, and the random die roll represents that mayhem.

Attack Rolls

Perhaps the most frequent die rolls you make in the D&D game are attack rolls. All attack rolls are described in this way:
[Ability] vs [Defense]
For example, a wizard's fireball spell is an Intelligence attack against the target's Reflex defense (written as Intelligence Vs Reflex). A fighter's longsword attack is a Strength attack against Armor Class (or AC). The ability score and the defense involved depend on the attack you're using. If the check result is higher than or equal to your opponent's defense, you hit and (usually) deal damage.
Attack
To make an attack, roll 1d20 and add the following:
  • One-half your level
  • The relevant ability score modifier
  • All other modifiers
The total is your attack result.

Skill Check


The knowledge and talents your character has learned are represented by skill checks. When you use a skill, you hope for a result higher than the DC of the task. For example, a cleric's Heal check is a skill check for a specific DC. A rogue's Stealth check is a skill check against a DC equal to the target's Perception check result (an opposed check). If the check result is higher than or equal to the DC, you succeed.
Skill Check
To make a skill check, roll 1D20 and add the following:
  • One-half your level
  • The relevant ability score modifier
  • All other modifiers

The total is your skill check result.

Ability Check

Sometime you're not making an attack or a skill check but trying to accomplish a task that doesn't fall into either category. You make an ability check. Ability checks give the DM a way to adjudicate actions when an attack or a skill check isn't appropriate.
Ability Check
To make an ability check, roll 1D20 and add the following:
  • One-half your level
  • The relevant ability score modifier
  • All other modifiers
The total is your ability check result.

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Re: D&D 4th Edition Rules

Post by TheDeceiverGod on 1/12/2011, 12:35 am

Skills

Has your character studied ancient toms that described the nature of magic and the structure of the universe? Do you have a golden tongue that can pass off the most outrageous lies as truth? Do you have a knack for getting information out of people, or have you trained in balance and tumbling? These capabilities are represented in the game by skills.
As an adventurer, you have a basic level of competence in every skill, and you get more competent as you advance in level. Your ability scores affect your use of skills; a halfling rogue with a high Dexterity is better at Acrobatics than a clumsy dwarf paladin with a lower Dexterity. Your aptitude at a skill is measured in the game with skill checks-a D20 roll determines whether and sometimes how well you succeed at any skill-based task you might attempt.

Skill Training
Training in a skill means that you have some combination of formal instruction, practical experience, and natural aptitude using that skill. When you select a skill to be trained in you gain a permanent +5 bonus to that skill. You can't gain training in a skill more than once. The table below shows the skills available in the game, the ability modifier you use when you make that kind of skill check.

Skill Ability
Acrobatics Dexterity
Arcana Intelligence
Athletics Strength
Bluff Charisma
Diplomacy Charisma
Dungeoneering Wisdom
Endurance Constitution
Heal Wisdom
History Intelligence
Insight Wisdom
Intimidate Charisma
Nature Wisdom
Perception Wisdom
Religion Intelligence
Stealth Dexterity
Streetwise Charisma
Thievery Dexterity

Using Skills

When you use a skill, you make a skill check. This check represents your training, your natural talent (your ability modifier), your overall experience (one-half your level), other applicable factors (relevant bonuses) and sheer luck (a die roll). The DM tells you if a skill check is appropriate in a given situation or directs you to make a check if circumstances call for one.
Skill Check Bonuses
When you create your character, you should determine your base skill check bonus for each skill you know. Your base skill check bonus for a skill includes the following:
  • One-half your level
  • Your ability score modifier (each skill is based on one of your ability scores)
  • A +5 bonus if you're trained in the skill
    In addition, some or all of the following factors might apply to your base skill check bonus.
  • Armor check penalty, if you're wearing some kinds of armor and making a check using Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution as the key ability.
  • Racial or feat bonuses
  • An item bonus from a magic item
  • A power bonus
  • any untyped bonuses that might apply.

Difficulty Class
When you make skill checks, high results are best. You're always trying to meet of beat a certain number. Often, that's a fixed number, called a Difficult Class (DC). The DC depends on what you're trying to accomplish and is ultimately set by the Dungeon Master. The skill entries in this chapter give sample DCs for each skill. The DM sets the DCs for specific situations based on level, conditions, and circumstances, as detailed in the Dungeon Master's Guide. All DCs assume acting in situations that are far from mundane; the DM should call for checks only in dramatic situations.

Opposed Checks
Sometimes, you make a skill check as a test of your skill in one general area or in a different one. When you use Stealth, for example, you're testing your ability to hide against someone else's ability to spot hidden things (the Perception skill). These skill contests are called opposed checks. When you make an opposed check, both characters roll, and the higher check result wins. If there's a tie, the character with the higher check modifier wins. If it's still a tie, both sides roll again to break the tie.

Checks without Rolls
In some situations, luck does not affect whether you succeed or fail. In a calm environment (outside an encounter), when dealing with a mundane task, you can rely on sheer ability to achieve results.
Take 10
When you're not in a rush, not being threatened or distracted (when you're outside an encounter), and when you're dealing with a mundane task, you can choose to take 10. Instead of rolling a D20, determine your skill check result as if you had rolled the average (10). When you take 10, your result equals your skill modifiers (including one-half your level) + 10. For mundane tasks, taking 10 usually results in a success.
Take 10
Your check result when you take 10 is equal to 10 + your base skill check bonus for a particular skill.

Passive Checks
When you're not actively using a skill, you're assumed to be taking 10 for any opposed checks, using that skill. Passive checks are most commonly used for Perception checks and Insight checks, but the DM might also use your passive check result with skills such as Arcana or Dungeoneering to decide how much to tell you about a monster at the start of an encounter. For example, if you're walking through an area you expect to be safe and thus aren't actively looking around for anger, you're taking 10 on your Perception check to notice hidden objects or enemies. If your Perception check is high enough, or a creature rolls poorly on its Stealth check, you might notice the creature even if you aren't actively looking for it.

Cooperation
In some situations, you ad your allies can work together to use a skill; your allies can help you make a skill check by making a check themselves. Each ally who gets a result of 10 or higher gives you a +2 bonus to your check. Up to four allies can help you for a maximum bonus of +8. If you have a choice, let the character in your group who has the highest base skill check bonus take the lead, while the other characters cooperate to give bonuses to the check.

Skill Challenges
A skill challenge is an encounter in which your skills, rather than your combat abilities, take center stage. In contrast to an obstacle that requires one successful skill check, a skill challenge is a complex situation in which you must make several successful checks, often using a variety of skills, before you can claim success in the encounter.

The Dungeon Master's Guide contains rules for skill challenges, and each encounter has it's own guidelines and requirements. In one skill challenge, you might use a Diplomacy check to entreat a duke to send soldiers into a mountain pass, a History check to remind him what happened when his ancestors neglected the pass's defense, and an Insight check to realize that having your fighter companion lean on the duke with an Intimidate check wouldn't help your cause. In another skill challenge, you might use Nature checks and Perception checks to track cultists through a jungle, a Religion check to predict a lightly spot for their hidden temple, and an Endurance check to fight off the effects of illness and exhaustion over the course of days in the jungle.

Whatever the details of a skill challenge, the basic structure of a skill challenge is straightforward. Your goal is to accumulate a specific number of victories (usually in the form of successful skill checks) before you get too many defeats (failed checks). It's up to you to think of ways you can use your skills to meet the challenges your face.

Knowledge Skills

Some skills deal with knowledge about a particular topic: Arcana, Dungeoneering, History, Nature, and Religion. You can use such skills to remember a useful bit of information in its field of knowledge or to recognize a clue related to it. You can also use such a skill to identify certain kinds of monsters, as noted in a skill's description.The check DC increases based on the specific topic and how common the knowledge is. Sometimes your DM might decide that the information you seek is available only to characters trained in appropriate knowledge.
Paragon and Epic Tiers:If the knowledge pertains to the paragon tier or the epic tier, the DC increases as shown on the tables later in this sections.

Knowledge Checks
Regardless of the knowledge skill you're using, refer to the rules here when making a knowledge check.
Common Knowledge: This includes the kind of general information that is commonly known about a given topic.
Expert Knowledge: This includes the kind of specialized information that only an expert in the field of study could possibly know.
Master Knowledge: This includes the kind of esoteric information that only a master in the field of study could possibly know.

Knowledge Skill: No action required-either you know the answer or you don't.
  • DC: See the table.
  • Success: You recall a useful bit of information in your field of knowledge or recognize a clue related to it.
  • Failure: You don't recall any pertinent information. The DM might allow you to make a new check if further information comes to light.
Level of KnowledgeDifficulty Check
Common 15
Expert 20
Master 25
Paragon tier +10
Epic tier+15

Monster Knowledge Checks

Regardless of the knowledge skill you're using, refer to the rules here when making a check to identify a monster.
Monster Knowledge: No action required-etiher you know the answer of your don't.
  • DC: See the table
  • Success: You identify a creature as well as its type typical temperament, and keywords. Higher results give you information about the creature's powers, resistances, and vulnerabilities.
  • Failure: You don't recall any pertinent information. The DM might allow you to make a new check if further information comes to light.
Monster KnowledgeDifficulty Check
Name, type, and keywords 15
Powers 20
Resistances and vulnerabilities 25
Paragon tier creature +5
Epic tier creature +10



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Re: D&D 4th Edition Rules

Post by TheDeceiverGod on 1/16/2011, 2:13 am

Skill Descriptions

The first line of a skill description shows the name of the skill, followed by the key ability for that skill. You use the ability modifier for that ability score to figure out your base skill check bonus. For skills based on Strength, Constitution, and Dexterity, the description includes a reminder that your armor check penalty applies to that skill.

The skill description explains the different ways you can use the skill and provide typical DCs. Each description also specifies what kind of action is required to use the skill.


Acrobatics (Dexterity)
Armor Check Penalty
You can perform an acrobatic stunt, keep your balance while walking on narrow or unstable surfaces, slip free of a grab or restrains, or take less damage from a fall.

Acrobatics Stunt
Make an Acrobatics check to swing from a chandelier, somersault over an opponent, slide down a staircase on your shield, or attempt any other acrobatics stunt that you can imagine and that your DM agrees to let you try. The DM sets the DC based on the complexity of the stunt and the danger of the situation. If the stunt fails, you fall prone in the square where you began the stunt (the DM might change where you land, depending on the specific stunt and situation). Your DM always has the right to say that a stunt won't work in a particular situation or set a high DC.
Acrobatics Stunt: Standard action or move action, depending on the stunt.
  • DC: Base DC 15.
  • Success: You perform an acrobatic stunt.
  • Failure: You fail to pull off the stunt and might fall or suffer some other consequence.
Balance
Make an Acrobatics check to move across a surface less than 1 foot wide (such as a ledge or tightrope) or across an unstable surface (such as a wind-tossed rope bridge or a rocking log).
Balance: Part of a move action.
  • DC: See the table
  • Success: You can move one-half your speed across a narrow or unstable surface.
  • Fail by 4 or Less: You stay in the square you started in and lose the rest of your move action, but you don't fall. Yyou can try again as part of a move action.
  • Fail by 5 or More: You fall off the surface and lose the rest of your move action. If you are trying to move across an unstable surface that isn't narrow, you instead fall prone in the square you started in. You can try again as part of a move action if you're still on the surface.
  • Grant Combat Advantage: While you are balancing, enemies have combat advantage against you.
  • Taking Damage: If you take damage, you must make a new Acrobatics check to remain standing
Surface Acrobatics DC
Narrow or unstable 20
Very narrow (less than 6 inches) +5
Narrow an unstable +5
Escape from a Grab
Make an Acrobatics check to wriggle out of a grab. You can also make escape attempts to get away from other immobilizing effects, as directed by your DM.

Escape from Restraints
Man an Acrobatics check to slip free of restraints.
Escape from Restrains: 5 minutes.
  • DC: Base DC 20. The DC is determined by the type of restraint and its quality, as set by the DM.
  • Fast Escape: You can make an escape attempt as a standard action, but the DC increases by 10.
  • Success: You slip free of a physical restraint.
  • Failure: You can try again only if someone else aids you.
Reduce Falling Damage (Trained Only)
If you fall or jump down from a height, you can make an Acrobatics check to reduce the amount of falling damage you take.
Reduce Falling Damage: Free action if you fall or move action if you jump down.
  • Damage Reduced: Make an Acrobatics check, and reduce the amount of falling damage you take by one-half your check result (round down).


Arcana (Intelligence)
You have picked up knowledge about magic-related lore and magic effects. This knowledge extends to information about the following planes of existence, including creatures native to those planes: the Elemental Chaos, the Feywild, and the Shadowfell. If you have selected this skill as a trained skill, your knowledge represents academic study, either formalized or as a hobby. Also, those trained in the skill have a chance to know something about the mysterious Far Realm (but not about its creatures, which fall under Dungeoneering).

Arcana Knowledge
Make an Arcana check to recall a useful bit of magic-related knowledge or to recognize a magic-related clue. See "Knowledge Checks."
You must be trained in Arcana to remember information about the Far Realm, which requires master knowledge at least.

Monster Knowledge
Elemental, Fey, and Shadow
Make an Arcana check to identify a creature that has the elemental, the fey, or the shadow origin (a creature of the Elemental Chaos, the Feywild, or the Shadowfell), or is a construct. See "Monster Knowledge Checks"

Detect Magic (Trained Only)
Your knowledge of magic allows you to identify magical effects and sense the presence of magic.
Identify Conjuration or Zone: Minor action.
  • DC: DC 15+ one-half the power's level. You must be able to see the effect of the conjuration or zone.
  • Success: You identify the power used to create the effect and its power source and keywords.
  • Failure: You can't try to identify the effect again during this encounter.
Identify Ritual: Standard action.
  • DC: DC 20 + one-half the ritual's level. You must be able to see or otherwise detect the ritual's effects.
  • Success: You identify the ritual and its category.
  • Failure: You can't try to identify the ritual again until after an extended rest.
Identify Magical Effect: Standard action.
  • DC: DC 20 + one-half the effect's level, if any. You must be able to see or otherwise detect the effect.
  • Not a Power or a Ritual: The magical effect must be neither from a magic item nor the product of a power or a ritual.
  • Success: You learn the effect's name, power source, and keywords, if any of those apply.
  • Failure: You can't try to identify the effect again until after an extended rest.
Sense the Presence of Magic: 1 minute.
  • DC: DC 20 + one-half the level of a magic item, power (conjuration or zone, ritual, or magical phenomenon within range.
  • Area of Detection: You can detect magic within a number of squares equal to 5 + your level in every direction, and you can ignore any sources of magical energy you're already aware of. Ignore all barriers; you can detect magic through walls, doors, and such.
  • Success: You detect each source of magical energy whose DC you meet. You learn the magic's power source, if any. If the source of magical energy is within line of sight, you pinpoint its location. If it's not within line of sight, you know the direction from which the magical energy emanates, but you don't know the distance to it.
  • Failure: Either you detected nothing or there was nothing in range to detect. You can't try again in this area until after an extended rest.


Athletics (Strength)
Armor Check Penalty
Make an Athletics check to attempt physical activities that rely on muscular strength, including climbing, escaping from a grab, jumping, and swimming.

Climb
Make an Athletics check to climb up or down a surface. Different circumstances and surfaces make climbing easier or harder.
Climb: Part of a move action.
  • DC: See the table. If you use a climber's kit, you get a +2 bonus to your Athletics check. If you can brace yourself between two surfaces, you get a +5 bonus to your check.
  • Success: You climb at one-half your speed. When you climb to reach the top of a surface, such as when you climb out of a pit, the distance to reach the top including allowing you to arrive in the square adjacent to the surface. The last square of moment places you on the that square.
  • Fail by 4 or Less: You stay where you started an lose the rest of your move action, but you don't fall. You can try again as part of a move action.
  • Fail by 5 or More: You fall and lose the rest of your move action.
  • Grant Combat Advantage: While you are climbing, all enemies have combat advantage against you.
  • Uses Movement: Count the number of squares you climb as part of your move.
  • Taking Damage: If you take damage while climbing you must make a Climb check using the DC for the surface you're climbing. If that damage makes you bloodied, increase the DC by 5. If you fail the check, you fall from your current height. If you try to catch hold when you fall, add the damage you take to the DC to catch yourself.
  • Catch Hold: If you fall while climbing, you can make an Athletics check as a free action to catch hold of something to stop your fall. The base DC to catch hold of something is the DC of the surface you were climbing plus 5, modified by circumstances. You can make one check to catch hold. If you fail, you can't try again unless the DM rules otherwise.
  • Climb Speed: While climbing, creatures that have a climb speed (such as monstrous spiders) use that speed, ignore difficult terrain, do not grant combat advantage because of climbing and do not make Athletics checks to climb.
SurfaceAthletics DC Surface Athletics DC
Ladder 0 Rough Surface (brick wall) 20
Rope 10Slippery Surface +5
Uneven Surface (cave wall)15 Unusually Smooth Surface +5

Escape from a Grab
Make an Athletics check to muscle out of a grab. You can also make escape attempts to get away from other immobilizing effects as directed by your DM.

Jump
Make an Athletics check to jump vertically to reach as dangling rope or a high ledge or to jump horizontally to leap across a pit, a patch of difficult terrain, a low wall, or some other obstacle.
High Jump: Part of a move action.
  • Distance Jumped Vertically: Make an Athletics check and divide your check result by 10 (round down). This is the number of freet you can leap up . The result determines the height that your feet clear with a jump. To determine if you can reach something while leaping, add your character's height plus one-third rounded down (a 6-food-tall character would add 8 feet to the final distance, and a 4-foot-tall character would add 5 feet).
  • Running Start: If you move at least 2 squares before making the jump, divide your check result by 5 not 10.
  • Uses Movement: Count the number of squares you jump as part of your move. If you run out of movement, you fall. You can end your first move in midair if you double move
Long Jump: Part of a move action.
  • Distance Jumped Horizontally: Make an Athletics check and divide your check result by 10 (don't round the result). This is the number of square you can leap across. You land in the square determined by your result. If you end up over a pit of chasm, you fall and lose the rest of your move action.
  • Distance Cleared Vertically: The vertical distance you clear is equal to one-quarter the of the distance you jumped horizontally. If you could not clear the vertical distance of an obstacle along the way, you hit the obstacle, fall pron, and lose the rest of your move action.
  • Running Start: If you move at least 2 squares before making the jump, divide your check result by 5, not 10.
  • Uses Movement: Count the number of squares you jump as part of your move. If you run out of movement, you fall. You can end your first move in midair if you double move.

Swim
Make an Athletics check to swim or tread water. Different conditions make swimming harder. See the Endurance skill for information on swimming or treading water for an hour or more.
Swim or Tread Water: Part of a move action.
  • DC: See the table.
  • Success: You swim at one-half your speed, or you stay afloat and tread water.
  • Fail by 4 or Less: Stay where you are and lose the rest of your move action. You can try again as part of a move action.
  • Fail by 5 or Move: Sink 1 square and risk suffocation by drowning.
  • Uses Movement: Count the number of squares you swim as part of your move.
  • Swim Speed: While swimming, creatures that have a swim speed use that speed and do not make Athletics checks to swim.

Water Athletics DC
Calm 10
Rough 15
Stormy 20


Bluff (Charisma)

You can make what's false appear to be true, what's outrageous seem plausible, and what's suspicious seem ordinary. You make a Bluff check to fast-talk a guard, con a merchant, gamble, pass off a disguise or fake documentation, and otherwise tell lies. Your Bluff check is opposed by an observer's Insight check. Your check might be opposed by multiple Insight checks, depending on how many observers can see and hear you and care about what's going on. During a skill challenge, you might need to beat your observers' Insight checks multiple times to succeed at bluffing them.
Bluff: Standard action in combat or part of a skill challenge.
  • Opposed Check: Bluff vs. Insight.
  • Gain Combat Advantage: Once per combat encounter, you can try to gain combat advantage against an adjacent enemy by feinting. As a standard action, make a Bluff check opposed by the enemy's Insight check. If you succeed, you gain combat advantage against the enemy until the end of your next turn.
  • Create a Diversion to Hide: Once per combat encounter, you can create a diversion to hide. As a standard action, make a Bluff cehck opposed by the Insight check of an enemy that can see you (if multiple enemies can see you, your Bluff check is opposed by each enemy's Insight check.) If you succeed, you create a diversion and can immediately make a Stealth check to hide.


Diplomacy (Charisma)
You can influence others with your tact, subtlety, and social grace. Make a Diplomacy check to change opinions, to inspire good will, to haggle with a patron, to demonstrate proper etiquette and decorum, or to negotiate a deal in good faith.
A Diplomacy check is made against a DC set by the DM. The target's general attitude toward you (friendly or unfriendly, peaceful or hostile) and other conditional modifiers (such as what you might be seeking to accomplish or what you're asking for) might apply to the DC. Diplomacy is usually used in a skill challenge that requires a number of successes, but the DM might call for a Diplomacy check in other situations.


Dungeoneering (Wisdom)

You have picked up knowledge and skills related to Dungeoneering, including finding your way through dungeon complexes, navigating winding caverns, recognizing dungeon hazards, and foraging for food in the Underdark. If you have selected this skill as a trained skill, your knowledge represents formalized study or extensive experience, and you have a better chance of knowing esoteric information in this field. Also, those trained in the skill can identify creatures of the Far Realm that lair and hunt in dungeons and underground settings.


Dungeoneering Knowledge
Make a Dungeoneering check to remember a useful bit of knowledge about an underground environment or to recognize an underground hazard of clue. See "Knowledge Checks"
Examples of dungeoneering knowledge include determining cardinal directions while underground (common), recognizing a dangerous underground plant (expert), or spotting new construction or noticing a change in depth while exploring an area (expert).

Forage
Make a Dungeoneering check to locate and gather enough food and water to last for 24 hours. You can do this only in underground environments that approximate outdoor wilderness-caverns or underground complexes containing pools of water, edible fungus or lichen, small vermin, and the like.
Forage: 1 hour
  • DC: DC 15 to find food and water for one person, DC 25 for up to five people. The DM might adjust the DC in different environments (5 lower in a cultivated environment or 5 higher in a barren one).
  • Success: You find enough food and water for 24 hours.
  • Failure: You find no food or water. You can forage again but in a different area.

Monster Knowledge
Aberrant
Make a Dungeoneering check to identify a creature that has the aberrant origin (a creature of the Far Realm.) See "Monster Knowledge Checks."



Endurance (Constitution)
Armor Check Penalty
Make an Endurance check to stave off ill effects and to push yourself beyond normal physical limits. You can hold your breath for long periods of time, forestall the debilitating effects of hunger and thirst, and swim or tread water for extended periods.
Some environmental hazards- including extreme temperatures, violent weather, and diseases- require you to make an Endurance check to resist and delay debilitating effects.
Endurance: No action required.
  • DC: See the table. The check DC varies based on the situation and the level of the hazard.
  • Success: You endure a particular situation.
  • Failure: You can't try again until circumstances change or a certain amount of time has elapsed.
Task Endurance DC
Endure Extreme Weather Base 15
Resist Disease Varies
Ignore Hunger 10 + 2 per day
Ignore Thirst 15 + 2 per day
Hold Breath (each round after 5) 10 + 1 per round
Swim or Tread Water (after 1 hour) 15 + 2 per hour



Heal (Wisdom)

You know how to help someone recover from wounds or debilitating conditions, including disease.

First Aid
Make a Heal check to administer first aid.
First Aid: Standard action.
  • DC: Varies depending on the task you're attempting.
  • Use Second Wind: Make a DC 10 Heal check to allow an adjacent character to use his or her second wind without the character having to spend an action. The character doesn't gain the defense bonuses normally granted by second wind.
  • Stabilize the Dying: Make a DC 15 Heal check to stabilize an adjacent dying character. If you succeed, the character can stop making death saving throws until he or she takes damage. The character's current hit point total doesn't change as a result of being stabilized.
  • Grant a Saving Throw: Make a DC 15 Heal check. If you succeed, an adjacent ally can immediately make a saving throw, or the ally gets +2 bonus to a saving throw at the end of his or her next turn.

Treat Disease
Make a Heal check to treat a character suffering from a disease.
Treat Disease: Part of the diseased character's extended rest. You must attend the character periodically throughout the extended rest, and you make your Heal check when the rest ends.
  • Replaces Endurance: Your Heal check result determines the disease's effects if the result is higher than the diseased character's Endurance check result.



History (Intelligence)

You have picked up knowledge related to the history of a region and beyond, including the chronological record of significant events and an explanation of their causes. This is includes information pertaining to royalty and other leaders, wars, legends, significant personalities, laws, customs, traditions, and memorable events. If you have selected this skill as a trained skill, your knowledge represents academic study, either formalized or as a hobby, and you have a better chance of knowing esoteric information in this field.
Make a History check to remember a useful bit of historical knowledge or to recognize a historical clue.



Insight (Wisdom)

You can discern intent and decipher body language during social interactions. You make an Insight check to comprehend motives, to read between the lines, to get a sense of moods and attitudes, and to determine how truthful someone is being. You use Insight to counter a Bluff check, and Insight is used as the social counterpart to the Perception skill. In skill challenges that require a number of successes, use Insight checks to oppose someone's Bluff checks. Insight can also be used to gain clues, figure out how well you might be doing in a social situation, and to determine if someone is under the influence of an outside force.

Whenever you use Insight, you're making a best guess as to what you think a motive or attitude is or how truthful a target is being. Insight is not an exact science or a supernatural power; it represents your ability to get a sense of how a person is behaving.
Insight: No action required when countering a Bluff check, minor action in combat, or part of a skill challenge. Requires some amount of interaction to get a read on a target.
  • DC: See the table. If you're trying to see through a bluff, this is an opposed check against your opponent's Bluff check.
  • Success: You counter a Bluff check, gain a clue about a social situation, sense an outside influence on someone or recognize an effect as illusory.
  • Failure: You can't try again until circumstance change.
  • Recognize an Effect as Illusory: The DM might use your passive Insight check to determine if you notice the telltale signs of an illusion effect. Noticing such an effect doesn't break the illusion, but you recognize the effect as illusory.
Task Insight DC
Sense motives, attitudes 10 + creature's level
Sense outside influence 25 + effect's level
Recognize effect as illusory 15 + effect's level



Intimidate (Charisma)

Make an Intimidate check to influence through hostile actions, overt threats, and deadly persuasion. Intimidate can be used in combat encounters or as part of a skill challenge that requires a number of successes. Your Intimidate checks are made against a target's Will defense or a DC set by the DM. The target's general attitude toward you and other conditional modifiers (such as what you might be seeking to accomplish or what you're asking for) might apply to the DC.

Intimidate: Standard action in combat or part of a skill challenge.
  • Opposed Check: Intimidate vs. Will (see the table for modifiers to your target's will defense). If you can't speak a language your target understands, you take a -5 penalty to your check. If you attempt ot intimidate multiple enemies at once, make a separate Intimidate check against each enemy's Will defense. Each target must be able to see and hear you.
  • Success: You force a bloodied target to surrender, get a target to reveal secrets against its will, or cow a target into taking some other action.
  • Failure: If you attempted to intimidate the target during combat, you can't try again against that target during this encounter.
  • Target Becomes Hostile: Using Intimidate usually makes a target hostile toward you, even if you don't succeed on the check.
Enemy is... Will Defense Modifier
Hostile +10
Unfriendly +5



Nature (Wisdom)

You have picked up knowledge and skills related to nature, including finding your way through the wilderness, recognizing natural hazards, dealing with and identifying natural creatures, and living off the land. If you have selected this skill as a trained skill, your knowledge represents formalized study or extensive experience, and you have a better chance of knowing esoteric information.

Forage
Make a Nature check to locate and gather enough food and water to last for 24 hours.
Forage: 1 hour.
  • DC: DC 15 to find food and water for one person. DC 25 for up to five people. The DM might adjust the DC in different environments (5 lower in a cultivated environment of 5 higher in a barren one).
  • Success: You find enough food and water for 24 hours.
  • Failure: You find no food or water. You can forage again but in a different area.

Handel Animal
Make a Nature check to calm down a natural beast, teach a natural beast some tricks, or otherwise handle a natural beast. Handling a natural beast is usually part of a skill challenge that requires a number of successes.

Nature Knowledge
Make a Nature check to remember a useful bit of knowledge about the natural world-about terrain, climate, weather, plants, and seasons-or to recognize a nature-related clue. See "Knowledge Checks."

Examples of Nature knowledge include determining cardinal direction of finding a path (common), recognizing a dangerous plant or another natural-hazard (Master), or predicting a coming change in the weather (expert).

Monster Knowledge
Natural
Make a Nature check to identify a creature that has the natural origin (a creature of the natural world). See "Monster Knowledge Checks."



Perception (Wisdom)

Make a Perception check to notice clues, detect secret doors, spot imminent dangers, find traps follow tracks, listen for sounds behind a closed door, or locate hidden objects. This skill is used against another creature's Stealth check or against a DC set by the DM. In most situations, the DM uses your passive Perception check result to determine if you notice a clue of an imminent danger.

Perception: No action required-either you notice something or you don't. Your DM usually uses your passive Perception check result. If you want to use the skill actively, you need to take a standard action or spend 1 minute listening or searching, depending on the task.
  • Opposed Check: Perception Vs. Stealth when trying to spot or hear a creature using Stealth. Your check might be modified by distance or if you're listening through a door or wall (see the table).
  • DC: See the table for DCs when you're trying to hear or spot something, searching an area, or looking for tracks.
  • Success: You spot or hear something.
  • Failure: you can't try again unless circumstances change.
  • Searching: When actively searching an area or looking for something specific, assume you're searching each adjacent square. The DM might allow you to do this as a standard action, but usually searching requires at least 1 minute.
Listening ForPerception DC
Battle 0
Normal Conversation10
Whispers 20
Through a Door +5
Through a Wall +10
More than 10 squares away+2
Spot or SearchPerception DC
Barely Hidden10
Well Hidden25
More than 10 squares away+2
Find Tracks Perception DC
Soft Ground (Snow, loose dirt, mud)15
Hard ground (wood or stone)25
Rain or snow since tracks were made+10
Each day since tracks were made+2
Quarry obscured its tracks +5
Huge or larger creature -5
Group of ten or more-5



Religion (Intelligence)

You have picked up knowledge about dogs, religious traditions and ceremonies, divine effects, holy symbols, and theology. This knowledge extends to information about the undead and the Astral Sea, including the creatures of that plane. If you have selected this skill as a trained skill, your knowledge represents academic study, either formalized or as a hobby, and you have a better chance of knowing esoteric information in this field.

Religion Knowledge
Make a Religion check to remember a useful bit of religion knowledge or to recognize a religion-related clue. See "Knowledge Checks"

Monster Knowledge
Immortal or Undead
Make a Religion check to identify a creature that has the immortal origin (a creature of the Astral Sea) or the undead keyword. See "Monster Knowledge Checks."



Stealth (Dexterity)
Armor Check Penalty
Make a Stealth check to conceal yourself from enemies, slink past guards, slip away without being noticed, and sneak up on people without being seen or heard. This skill is used against another creature's Perception check or against a DC set by the DM.

Stealth: Part of whatever action you are trying to perform stealthily.
  • Opposed Check: Stealth vs. Perception (see the table for modifiers to your check). If there are multiple observers, your Stealth check is opposed by each observer's Perception check.
  • Cover or Concealment: Unless a creature is distracted, you must have cover or concealment from the creature to make a Stealth check. You have to maintain cover or concealment to remain unnoticed. If a creature has unblocked line of sight to you (that is you lack any cover or concealment), that creature automatically sees you (no perception check required).
  • Superior Cover or Total Concealment: If you have superior cover or total concealment, a creature can't see you and can't be sure of your exact location. If it's Perception check beats your Stealth check, though, it knows you are present, knows the direction to your location, and has a vague idea of the distance between the two of you. If its Perception check beats your Stealth check by 10 or more, the creature can pinpoint your location until the end of your next turn, even if you move.
  • Distracted Creature: If a creature is distracted, you can attempt to hide from that creature even when you don't have cover or concealment. In combat, creatures are assumed to be paying attention in all directions. Outside combat, a creature might be paying attention to something in a certain direction, allowing you to hide behind the creature's back. You make a Stealth check as normal to avoid the creature's notice, since it might hear you.
  • Success: You avoid notice, unheard and hidden from view. If you later attack or shout, you're no longer hidden.
  • Failure: You can't try again unless observers become distracted or you manage to obtain cover or concealment.
  • Combat Advantage: You have combat advantage against a target that isn't aware of you.
  • Light Source: Observes automatically see you if you're carrying a light source.

You... Stealth Modifier
Speak -5
More more than 2 squares -5
Run -10



Streetwise (Charisma)

When in a settlement- a village, a town, or a city-make a Streetwise check to find out what's going on-who the movers and shakers are, where to get what you need (and how to get there,) and where not to go.

Streetwise: Using this skill takes 1 hour and might be part of a skill challenge.
  • DC: See the table.
  • Success: You collect a useful bit of information, gather rumors, find out about available jobs, or locate the best deal.
  • Failure: You can try again, but you might draw attention to yourself if you keep chasing after the same information.
Settlement and InformationStreetwise DC
Typical Settlement15
Hostile Settlement 20
Totally Alien Settlement 30
Information is readily available-2
Information is hard to come by+5
Information is secret or closely guarded+10



Thievery (Dexterity)
Armor Check Penalty

You have picked up thieving abilities and can perform tasks that require nerves of steal and steady hand: disabling traps, opening locks, picking pockets, and sleight of hand.
The DM might decide that some uses of this skill are so specialized that you are required to be trained in it to have a chance of succeeding.

Disable Trap
Make a Thievery check to prevent from triggering. You need to be aware of a trap to try to disable it. Make a Perception check to find a hidden trap.
Disable Trap: Standard action in combat or part of a skill challenge.
  • DC: See the table. You get a +2 bonus to the check if you use thieves' tools.
  • Delay Trap: You get a +5 bonus to check if you try delay a trap, rather than disable it.
  • Success: You disable or delay the trap. Disabling a trap makes it harmless until it resets. Delaying a trap makes the trapped area safe for passage until the end of your next turn.
  • Fail by 4 or Less: Nothing happens. You can try again as a new action.
  • Fail by 5 or more: You trigger the trap.
Trap Thievery DC
Heroic tier20
Paragon tier 30
Epic tier35

Open Lock
Make a Thievery check to pick a lock.

Open Lock: Standard action in combat or part of a skill challenge.
  • DC:See the table. You get a +2 bonus to the check if you use thieves' tools.
  • Success: You pick the lock.
  • Failure: You can try again as a new action.
Heroic tierThievery DC
Heroic Tier20
Paragon Tier 30
Epic Tier 35

Pick Pocket
Make a Thievery check to lift a small object (such as a purse or an amulet) from a creature without that creature being aware of the theft. It must be an object that the creature isn't holding.
Pick Pocket: Standard Action.
  • DC: DC 20 + your target's level. If in combat, you take a -10 penalty to your check.
  • Success: You lift a small object from the target without the target noticing.
  • Fail by 4 or Less: You don't get the object, but the target didn't notice. You can try again as a new action.
  • Fail by 5 or More: You don't get the object, and the target notices your failed attempt.

Sleight of Hand
Make a Thievery check to palm an unattached object small enough to fit into your hand (such as a coin or a ring) or to perform an act of legerdemain.
Sleight of Hand: Standard action in combat or part of a skill challenge.
  • DC: Base DC 15.
  • Success: You palm an unattended, small object or perform an act of legerdemain.
  • Failure: You can still pick up the object, but onlookers see you pick it up, or they see through your act of legerdemain.

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Re: D&D 4th Edition Rules

Post by TheDeceiverGod on 1/19/2011, 9:16 pm

Combat

Whether it's a skirmish against a handful of orcs or an all-out battle with Orcus, Demon Prince of the Undead, combat is a staple of a Dungeons & Dragons adventure. Combat encounters usually begin when you enter an area containing monsters. Sometimes the monster enter your area instead-when werewolves attack your camp at night, for example-or you and the monsters stumble upon each other. You might meet on a road, or you might be exploring a dungeon when you run into a hostile patrol.

The Combat Sequence

A typical combat encounter is a clash between two sides, a flurry of weapon swings, feints, parries, footwork, and spell-casting. The Dungeons & Dragons game organizes the chaos of combat into a cycle of rounds and turns.

Rounds & Turns
  • Round: In a round, every combatant takes a turn. A round represents about 6 seconds in the game world.
  • Turn: On your turn, you take actions; a standard action, a move action, a minor action, and any number of free actions, in any order you wish. See "Action Types"

The actions in a combat encounter happen almost simultaneously in the game world, but to make combat manageable, combatants take turns acting-like taking turns in a board game. If your turn comes up before an enemy's, you actions take place before the enemy's actions do. The order of turns is determined at the beginning of a combat encounter, when combatants roll initiative.

A combat encounter follows these steps:
  1. Determine surprise. The DM determines whether any combatants are surprised. If any combatants notice enemy combatants without being noticed in return, the aware combatants gain a surprise round.
  2. Establish positions. The DM decides where the combatants are positioned on the battle grid. For example, if the PCs have just opened a door into a room, the DM might draw or arrange a depiction of the door and the room on the battle grid and then ask the players to arrange their miniatures near the door. Then the DM places miniatures that represent the monsters in the room.
  3. Roll Initiative. Everyone involved in a combat encounter rolls initiative, determining the order of the combatants' turns. You roll initiative only at the beginning of a combat encounter.
  4. Take surprise round actions. If any combatants gained a surprise round, they act in initiative order, each taking a single action. (Surprised combatants take no actions during the surprise round.) The surprise round then ends, and the first regular round of combat begins.
  5. Take turns. In initiative order, every combatant takes turns, which includes various actions. (combatants can also take certain actions on one another's turns.)
  6. Begin the next round. When every combatant has had a turn, the round ends. Begin the next round with the combatant who has the highest initiative.
  7. End the encounter. Repeat steps 5 and 6 until the combatants on one side are captured, fleeing, unconscious, or dead. The encounter ends when the other side ten takes a short rest or an extended rest.


Initiative
Before the first round of combat, you roll initiative. Rolling initiative is a Dexterity check and follows the normal rules for ability checks. The DM rolls initiative for your enemies.

Throughout a battle combatants act in order, from highest initiative result to lowest. The order in which combatants take their turns is called the initiative order. The initiative order remains the same from round to round, although a combatant's position in the order can change after delaying or readying an action.

Rolling Initiative
To determine a combat encounter's initiative order, roll initiative. To do so, make a Dexterity check.

Roll 1d20 and add the following:
  • One-half your level
  • Your Dexterity modifier
  • Any bonuses or penalties that apply
The Result is your initiative for this encounter.

When combatants have the same initiative, the combatant with the higher initiative bonus (the total of one-half your level, your Dexterity modifier, and any bonuses) goes before the other. If their bonuses are the same they can roll a die or flip a coin to break the tie.

The Surprise Round
Some battles begin wit ha surprise round. A surprise round occurs if any combatants are unaware of enemy combatants' presence of hostile intentions. For example, if you fail your Perception check to notice concealed enemies, you're surprised. Of if supposed allies spring an attack and you failed your Insight check to notice the attackers' traitorous intentions, you're surprised. But if any of your allies made their Perception or Insight checks, they're not surprised.

When any combatants achieve surprise, they act in initiative order during the surprise round. Surprised combatants don't act at all during the surprise round.

The Surprise Round
Two special rules apply to the surprise round.
  • Limited Action: If you get to act in the surprise round, you can take a standard action, a move action, or a minor action. You can also take free actions but you can't spend action points. After every nonsurprised combatant has acted, the surprise round ends, and you can act normally in subsequent rounds.
  • Surprised: If you're surprised, you can't take any actions (not even free actions, immediate actions or opportunity actions), and you grant combat advantage to all attackers. As soon as the surprise round ends, you are no longer surprised.

Action Types

A combat round is made up of actions. Fire an arrow, casting a spell, running across a room, opening a door- each of these activities, along with many others, is considered an action. You use different action types to do different things. For example, most attack powers are standard actions, and moving from one spot on the battlefield to another is normally a move action. (A few powers don't require an action to use.) See "Actions in Combat" for rules on many specific actions.

The Main Action Types
A typical combat round includes actions of four types; standard actions, move actions, minor actions, and free actions.
The Main Action Types
  • Standard Action: Standard actions are the core of combat. You can normally take one standard action on your turn. Examples: most attack powers, charging an enemy, using your second wind.
  • Move action: Move actions involve movement from one place to another. You can normally take them only on your turn. Examples: walking, teleporting.
  • Minor Action: Minor actions are enabling actions, simple actions that usually lead to more exciting actions. You can normally take them only on your turn. Examples: pulling an item from a pouch or a sheath, opening a door or treasure chest, picking up an item in your space or in an unoccupied square within reach.
  • Free Action: Free actions take almost no time or effort. You can take as many free actions as you want during your or another combatant's turn. The DM can restrict the number of free action in a turn. Examples: speaking a few sentences, dropping a held item, letting go of a grabbed enemy.
Triggered Action
Two action types-opportunity actions, and immediate actions-require triggers. A Trigger is an action, an event, or an effect that allows you to use a triggered action. (Some powers require a trigger but are free action or aren't actions at all.)
Opportunity Action
  • Trigger: Opportunity actions allow you to take an action in response to an enemy letting its guard down. The one type of opportunity action that every combatant can take is an opportunity attack. Opportunity attacks are triggered by an enemy leaving a square adjacent to you or by an adjacent enemy making a ranged attack, or an area attack.
  • Once per Combatant's Turn: You can take no more than one opportunity action on each other combatant's turn. You can't take an opportunity action on your own turn.
  • Interrupts Action: An opportunity action interrupts the action that triggered it.

There are two kinds of immediate actions: interrupts and reactions. Certain rules govern all immediate actions, whether they're immediate interrupts or immediate reactions.

Immediate Action
  • Trigger: Each immediate action-usually a power- defines its specific trigger. The one type of immediate action that every combatant can take is a readied action.
  • Once per Round: You can take only one immediate action per round, either an immediate interrupt of an immediate reaction. If you haven't taken an immediate action since the end of your last turn, you can take one when a trigger allows you to. You can't take an immediate action on your own turn.
  • Interrupt: An immediate interrupt lets you jump in when a certain trigger condition arises, acting before the trigger resolves. If an interrupt invalidates a triggering action, that action is lost. For example, an enemy makes a melee attack against you against you, but you use a power that lets you shift away as an immediate interrupt. If you enemy can no longer reach you, the enemy's attack is lost.
  • Reaction: An immediate reaction lets you act in response to a trigger. The triggering action, event, or condition occurs and is completely resolved before you take your reaction, except that you can interrupt a creature's movement. If a creature triggers your immediate reaction while moving (by coming into range, for example), you take your action before the creature finishes moving but after it has moved at least 1 square.

    An immediate reaction might interrupt other actions a combatant takes after its triggering action. For example, if a power lets you attack as an immediate reaction when an attack hits you, your action happens before the monster hit you can take any other action. If a monster has a power that lets it make two attack rolls against you as a standard action, and the first one hits you, you can use an immediate reaction before the next attack roll.

Taking Your Turn
When your turn comes up in the initiative order, it's time for you to act. Your turn has three parts: the start of your turn, the actions on your turn, and the end of your turn.

The Start Of Your Turn
Before you act, you keep track of certain effects. The start of your turn always takes place, even if you're unconscious, and it takes no time in the game world.

The Start Of Your Turn
  • Ongoing Damage: If you're suffering ongoing damage, you take the damage now.
  • Regeneration: If you have regeneration you regain hit points now.
  • Other Effects: Deal with any other effects that occur at the start of your turn.
  • End Effects: Some effects end automatically at the start of your turn.
  • No Actions: You can't take any actions at the start of your turn.

Actions On Your Turn
Durring your turn, you can take a few actions. You decide what to do with each, considering how your actions can help you and your allies achieve victory. See "Action Types" for the definitions of the different actions you can take.
Actions On Your Turn
  • Your Actions: You get the following three actions on your turn:
    Standard action
    Move action
    Minor actoin
  • Free Action: You can take any number of free actions on your turn.
  • Any Order: You can take your actions in any order you wish, and you can skip any of them.
  • Substitute Actions: You can take a move action or a minor action instead of a standard action, and you can take a minor action instead of a move action.
  • Extra Actions: You can take an extra action by spending an action point.
  • Other Combatants' Actions: Other combatants can take free actions on your turn, and you might take actions that trigger immediate actions or opportunity actions from other combatants.

The End of Your Turn
After you act, you keep track of any effects that stop at the end of your turn or that continue. The end of your turn always takes place even if you're unconscious and it takes no time in the game world.
The End of Your Turn
  • Saving Throws: You now make a saving throw against any effects on you that a save can end.
  • Check Actions Spent: Some powers and effects can be sustained for multiple turns. Check that you spent the action required to sustain a power or an effect during your turn. If you didn't spend the action the power or effect ends now.
  • End Effects: Some effects end automatically at the end of your turn.
  • No Actions: You can't take any actions at the end of your turn.

Actions on Other Turns
Most of your actoins take place on your turn. But you can take free actions on anyone's turn, and an event or another combatant's actions might provide an opportunity for you to take an immediate action, or an opportunity action on someone else's turn. See "Action Types"
Actions on Other Turns
  • Opportunity Actions: You can take one opportunity action on each other combatant's turn. An opportunity action must be triggered by an enemy's action.
  • Immediate Actions: You can take one immediate action per round, either an immediate interrupt or an immediate reaction. An immediate action must be triggered by an event or an action on another combatant's turn.
  • Free Action: You can take any number of ree action on other combatants' turns.

Attacks and Defense

Battles in the D&D game are won through cleverly chosen attacks, able defenses, and luck. On a typical turn, you'll use your standard action to make an attack, whether you're a stalwart fighter, a wily rogue, or a devout cleric. And your defenses will be frequently tested by your foes' attacks.

When you attack, you make an attack roll to determine whether your attack hits your target. You roll a d20, add a bonus for whatever attack you're using, and compare the result to one of the target's four defenses: Armor Class, Fortitude, Reflex, or Will. Each character has a number of attacks to choose from, including a basic attack. The exact attacks you have available depend on which powers you select for you character.

Making an Attack
All attacks follow the same basic process:
  1. Choose the attack you'll use. Each attack has an attack type.
  2. Choose targets for the attack. Each target must be within range. Check whether you can see and target your enemies.
  3. Make an attack roll.
  4. Compare your attack roll to the target's defense to determine whether you hit or miss.
  5. Deal damage and apply other effects.

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Re: D&D 4th Edition Rules

Post by TheDeceiverGod on 1/25/2011, 1:43 am

Attack Types
Attacks in the Dungeons & Dragons world take many forms. A fighter swings a greatsword at a foe. A ranger looses an arrow at a distant target. A dragon exhales a blast of fire. A wizard creates a burst of lightning. These examples illustrate the four attack types; melee, ranged, close, and area.

Melee Attack
A melee attack usually uses a weapon and targets one enemy within your melee reach (your reach is usually determined by the weapon you're wielding.) Attacking with a longsword or a polearm is a melee attack. Some powers allow you to make multiple melee attacks, against either multiple enemies or a single enemy.
Melee Attack
  • Targeted: Melee attacks target individuals. A melee attack against multiple enemies consist of a separate attack, each with its own attack roll and damage roll. Melee attacks don't create areas of effect.
  • Range: A melee attack's range usually equals your melee reach. (Sometimes a power specifies that it affects only adjacent targets, through, so even if you're using a reach weapon, you can't attack more distant targets with that power.)
  • Reach: Most characters have a reach of 1 square. Certain powers, feats, and weapons can increase your reach.
Simply wielding a weapon in each hand doesn't allow you to make two attacks in a round. If you hold two melee weapons, you can use either one to make a melee attack.


Ranged Attack
A ranged attack is a strike against a distant target. A ranged attack usually targets one creature within its range. Shooting a bow or casting a magic missile is a ranged attacked.
Ranged Attack
  • Targeted: Ranged attacks target individuals. A ranged attack against multiple enemies consists of separate attacks, each with its own attack roll and damage roll. Ranged attack don't create ares of effect. If you're using a projectile weapon to make a ranged attack against multiple targets, you need one piece of ammunition for each target, and if you're using thrown weapons, you need one for each target.
  • Range: Some powers set a specific range ("Range 10") or allow you to attack any target you can see ("Range sight"). If you're using a weapon the attack's range is the range of your weapon.
    Long Range: If you use a ranged weapon and your target is farther away than the weapon's normal range, but within tits long range, you take a -2 penalty to your attack roll. You can't hit a target beyond the weapon's long range. A ranged power that doesn't use a weapon has a normal range, but no long range.
  • Provoke Opportunity Attacks: If you use a ranged power while adjacent to an enemy, that enemy can make an opportunity attack against you.

Close Attack
A close attack is an area of effect that comes directly from you; its origin is within your space. Swinging your sword in an arc to hit every enemy next to you with one blow, creating a blast of fire from your hands, or causing radiant energy to burst from your holy symbol-these are all examples of close attacks.

Close attacks include two basic categories of powers: weapon attacks that damage multiple enemies with one swing, and powers created from energy that flows directly from your body or an object you carry.

Close Attack
  • Area of Effect: A close attack creates an area of effect, usually a blast or a burst. A close attack affects certain targets within its area of effect, which has a certain size. A close attack's area of effect and targets are specified in its power description.
  • Origin Square: A close attack's area of effect defines the attack's origin square, which is the attack's starting point. A close burst uses your space as its origin square. A close blast uses a square within your pace as its origin square. For targets to be affected by a close attack, there must be a line of effect from the origin square to the target.
  • Multiple Attack Rolls but one Damage Roll: When you make a close attack, you make a separate attack roll against each target in the area of effect, but you make a single damage roll that affects all the targets. A Large or larger creature hit by a close attack is affected only once by the attack, even if multiple squares of the creature's space are in the area of effect.
    If you're using a projectile weapon to make a close attack, you need one piece of ammunition for each target, and if you're using thrown weapons, you need one for each target.

Area Attack
Area attacks are similar to close attacks, except that the origin square can be some distance away from you. An area attack's area of effect sets the shape of the attack, and the targets it affects. A ball of fire that streaks across the battlefield and explodes is an example of an area attack. A magical wall of fog that springs from the ground to obscure a dungeon corridor is another example.

Area attacks include two categories of powers; projectiles that detonate in their origin squares and effects that appear far away from you and fill an area.
Area Attack
  • Area of Effect: An are area attack creates an area of effect, usually a burst or a wall, within range. An area attack affects certain targets within its area of effect, which has a certain size. An area attack's area of effect, range, and targets are specified in its power description.
  • Origin Square: You choose a square within an area attack's range as the attack's origin square, which is where you center or start the area of effect. You need line of effect from a square in your space to the origin square. For a target to be affected by an area attack, there needs to be line of effect from the origin square to the target. You don't have to be able to see the origin square or the target, and concealment between the origin square and the target doesn't apply.
  • Multiple Attack Rolls but One Damage Rolls: When you make an area attack, you make a separate attack roll against each target in the area of effect, but you make a single damage roll that affects all the targets. A Large or larger creature hit by an area attack is affected only once by the attack, even if multiple squares of the creature's spare are in the area of effect.
    If you're using a projectile weapon to make an area attack, you need on piece of ammunition for each target, and if you're using thrown weapons, you need one for each target.
  • Provoke Opportunity Attacks: If you use an area power while adjacent to an enemy, that enemy can make an opportunity attack against you.

Areas of Effect
Most area attacks and close attacks have one of three areas of effect: a blast, a burst, or a wall.
Areas of Effect
  • Blast: A blast fills an area adjacent to you that is a specified number of squares on a side. For example the wizard power thunderwave is a blast 3, which means the power affects a 3-square-by-3-square area adjacent to you. The blast must be adjacent to its origin square, which is a square in your space. The origin square is not affected by the blast. A blast affects a target only if the target is in the blast's area and if there is a line of effect from the origin square to the target.
  • Burst: A burst starts in an origin square and extends in all directions to a specified number of squares from the origin square. For example, the cleric power flame strike is a burst 2 within 10 squares of you, which means the power originates in a square up to 10 squares away from you and affects the origin square and every square within 2 squares of it (a 5-square-by-5-square area). Unless a power description notes otherwise, a close burst you create does not affect you. However, an area burst you create does affect you. A burst affects a target only if there is line of effect from the burst's origin square to the target.
  • Wall: A wall fills a specified number of contiguous squares within range, starting from an origin square. Each square of the wall must share a side-not just a corner-with at least one other square of the wall, but a square can share no more than two sides with other squares in the wall (this limitation does not apply when stacking squares on top of each other). You can shape the wall however you like within those limitations. A solid wall, such as a wall of ice, cannot be created in occupied squares.

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